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anniversary of a number of civil rights flashpoints. 1963 was a pretty important year in the civil rights movement or would i will call the black freedom struggle for the rest of the talk and none will be more celebrated than the march on washington that happened on august 28, 1963. i think we can imagine that the focus will be -- this is probably what we are going to see a lot of. dr. king, the celebrity of dr. king and the i have a dream speech. maybe there will be some mentioning of the complex of the march on washington, the labor unions and the practice and made it possible and did all of the organizing. maybe we will hear about the full name of the march on washington which was the march on washington for jobs and freedom, and maybe we will even hear about the kennedy administration horror about this march. they didn't want this to happen. a were concerned there would lead to the point president kennedy's shut down the federal government other than for the essential personnel the day that this occurred in 63. but, i am pretty certain that the commemoration is mostly going to focus o
and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being here. as i said, we're grailsd with th
, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, rus
the tremendous success of the civil rights movement and the demonstrated power of nonviolence and claims for participation in american citizenship and rights, why at this moment in the late 60's to the black panther party challenge america as an empire? way this politics become so influential and important? why did so many young revolutionaries in cities throughout the country take up arms and dedicate their lives to the revolution and the black panther party? and so i'm going to touch on a few themes that we have developed in the book to give you a taste of some of it here. the first thing is that one of the things i was very surprising to me when we started to look at this is in the mid-60's there were debates, rigorous debates happening in cities throughout the country, l.a., san francisco, oakland, chicago, new york. a black power ferment of people asking how do we take the gains in the successes and the power of the civil rights movement and translate into that power that can challenge poverty. the civil rights movement have been tremendously successful at dismantling jim crow and d
the tremendous success of the civil rights movement and really the demonstrative power of nonviolent civil disobedience and claims of participation and citizenship, why in this moment did the black panther party challenge america as empire? why did this politics become so influential and important? why did so many young revolutionaries in cities throughout the country take up arms and dedicate their lives to revolution and the black panther party? so i'm going to touch on a few themes that we develop in the book just to give you sort of a taste of some of the pieces of the answer here. the first thing is that one of the things that was very surprising to me when we started to look at this is that in the mid '60s there were debates, rigorous debates happening in cities throughout the country, l. a.m., san francisco and oakland, chicago, new york, a real ferment, a black power ferment of people asking how do we take the gains and the successes and the power of the civil rights movement, and how do we translate that into the kind of power that can challenge poverty and ghettoization. the civi
it's very exciting to see everybody talking about civil rights litigate or heroes which i think they are. >> what is next in the film and what do you see for film and how do people learn more about it. >> the film will be on hbo in july in the summer series which is great because they do a lot of marketing. we are selecting the open night. which is a thousand seat audience. it is the premier selection. it's at the film festival as it went to sundance and they voted it and it's a film we would like to bring home. we are doing as many film festivals as we can. we won the audience award and jury award in miami and doing as many speaking and community talk back events. the film i hope will become a gathering point for people to use and say this is what's happening in our jurisdiction. this shows the experience of just a few lawyers. there are many people struggling to do a great job across the country. >> what's your website? >> we'll be taking questions. now let's move to john rapping who is one of the individuals featured in the film. john, i remember when you first talked about s
. thomas e perez currently oversees the civil rights division and to no one's surprise he has a long history of controversy. and don't take my word for it. when he was floated as a potential pick, jay adams had this to say about his former colleague when he spoke "the great one" mark levin. >> tell us about this fellow perez before he went into the justice department. >> well, he's a radical's radical, used to be maryland, and worked with the-- he's an extreme radical, anti-business, a racialist to the core. >> can you imagine this man in charge of the labor department, the total leapt. >> totally lawless, this is a man for whom law is a nuisance. >> joining me now with the reaction from americans for justice, jay sekulow and congressman dennis kucinich. you didn't like when the black panthers were outside with the batons the polling place in philly, you didn't like that. >> that case didn't have anything to do with secretary designate perez. >> actually, it did. the issue came up with the new black panther case in which the inspector general reviewed the case and supported the accus
to take on. mario, on his first disobedience arrests and then he became involved in civil rights movement to protect housing discrimination after a local real estate office refused to work with him because he was black. then there were a very significant first. first african american elected to san francisco in the california state assembly. the first african american speaker of the california state assembly. and as we all know the first african mayor of san francisco [ applause ] >> first, the first, the first. and a speaker of the assembly he would also become the first and the only politicians to hold that position for 15 years. longer than any other individual so much so that a new paradigm was created with prop 140 which instituted term limits. had that not happened and all likelihood, willie brown might still be speaker had he so desired the. [ [ applause ] >> it's worth noting that willie became speaker of the state assembly after the coalition of republican and democrats. 28 republicans, 23 democrats. some say this goes back to a period of more consilt tree and less contentious pa
they were living in. they had to reflect the diversity of their workforce. it was a civil rights issue and also a business efficiency issue. we were dealing with domestic partnerships in other ways of trying to provide benefits and it was a complicated issue especially for companies with operations in multiple states. the feeling was let's do the right thing here, right for business, right for the human relations department, right for hiring right for retention right for civil rights. >> michael: your group, the chamber has supported gay marriage and gavin newsome battled to support it in francisco. was it a challenge to get people to agree to that? >> initially you might have thought like i did that maybe this was an issue that the community would not weigh in on. it was a non-direct business issue. we took it to public policy process with dozens of members who helped to form our public policy position to our board of directors over 06 members. unanimously directed the chamber to weigh in in the litigation of 2007, and we continue to do that on the most recent litigation. and it wasn'
. >> this is a big historic moment. >> this is a basic civil rights issue. >> our colleague, our teachers, our soldiers, our friends. >> can you imagine the next presidential campaign, a republican candidate saying flat-out, i am for gay marriage? >> i could. >> immigration makes us stronger. it is part of what makes this such a dynamic country. >> no immigration reform is going to happen unless republicans in the house sign on to it. >> the time's come for comprehensive, sensible immigration reform. >> we are going to have a vote on assault weapons and we're going to have a vote on background checks. >> he can't spend enough of his $27 billion to try to impose his will on the american public. >> 90% of the public want something. >> i mean, it's insane the stuff he says. >> this isn't about wayne lapierre. it's about the public wanting to be safe on their streets. ♪ you don't need a weatherman to know it's where the wind blows ♪ >> it's a busy and wintery monday on the east coast. congress is on spring break as lawmakers return to their districts where they're likely to face constituents r
on civil rights for gay americans in bour versus hard wig. in the summer of 1982, michael baurs was arrested and charged by atlanta police by committing a private act with another adult man in his own bedroom. his case made it to the high court in 1986 where georgia's law criminalizing adult gay male couples for engaging in private consensual sexual acts was upheld. it was not until 203 that that decision was overruled when the court recognized the constitutional right to privacy for lesbian and gay individuals. the struggle still continues. ten years after bowers, hawaii supreme court found the state ban own same-sex marriage violated its constitution. almost immediately shall the state specific ruling sparked campaigns across the country to deny marriage rights to same sex couples. launching a preemptive strike against marriage equality more than 30 states passed defense of marriage laws putting pressure on the federal government to follow suit and in 1996, president bill clinton, the democrat, he signed the federal defense of marriage act restricting the definition of marriag
of labor. he comes directly from the department of justice where he's the head of the civil rights division, the division responsible for enforcing federal discrimination statutes. white house officials point to the fact that he helped settle the three largest fair lending cases in the department history as some of the reasons why he should be the head over at labor. however, republicans are pointing to a report issued by the department of justice's i.g. last week, the inspector general that basically said that division that perez leads is still in two camps. they're examples of harassment, inappropriate personnel attacks and the i.g.'s report basically found all those issues predate president obama's tenure in office. however, they really haven't been addressed to the satisfaction of the i.g., inspector general, thus far. mr. perez says he's worked with the department, that there have been improvements since he's taken office there but a number of republicans are pointing to this, especially senator grassley saying that mr. perez is woefully unprepared to answer questions about this. remem
to doma. this was john lewis, 1996, talking about the civil right, the right of a human being to marry another. their there has been a long struggle for civil right for gay and lesbian people. and there were people early on who recognized this was a fundamental civil rights issue. the reason people are coming to that view is because of people coming out in their countries and whether it is john roberts or other people in the country realizing that they are brothers and sisters and cousins of people who are gay and lesbian. and it is inevitable. watching ralph reed with the most ridiculous argument i've ever heard of the many ridiculous arguments against gay marriage. he's arguing the only reason people get player sid to have children. people get married because they want to be in a loving, committed relationship with each other. there is no reason that fundamental right should be denied. >> to steve's point, ralph reed was not discussing the lawful he is talking about religion and emotional reaction to marriage and the sanctity of it. i want to play this. he was on "meet the press." >>
to present the plaque to mayor brown's unwavering commitment to civil rights. [ applause ] >> thank you richard brown. it's good to see you and thank you dr. parkel. that's all i got. i could listen to him talk all day. that was fantastic. >> christina, would you like to come up again? >> thank you. we have a few special thank yous that we want to wrap the ceremony up with. if vernal, elsie and deanna if you can please come up. we would really appreciate it. and so behalf on the mayor's office we would like to say thank you deeply for your contribution for making these services such a success. >> thank you. >> they are beautiful. >> for you. we have certificates of honor on behalf of the mayor's services. we are good at making certificates of honor. >> thank you. >> okay. and thank you to everybody for your contribution, your time and commitment to showing up today. the sponsors, we appreciate your support. now that concludes our ceremony. please enjoy the reception. thank you. >> i have been a cable car grip for 21 years. i am a third generation. my grand farther and my dad worked ove
already had a conservative back lash building against the court from griswold and from civil rights and from miranda even. so it wasn't just this one decision that created that sort of back lash. and the other reason i don't think the parallel holds here is because people who believe, who are pro-life. who are staunchly pro-life, believe that abortion is tantamount to murder. no one thinks that gay marriage is like murder. so i don't think the emotions here run quite as high either. it is hard to imagine people really taking to the streets if doma were to be overturn at this time. >> yeah. and the other part of that is that while the emotions come from the grassroots, there has been a real shift among the political leadership in this country. when you look from president obama to president clinton to hillary clinton to rob portman to dick cheney, cleric mccaskill, jon huntsman. there are a tremendous number of federal officials, highly visible people in both parties. not only saying people should have this right, which is the moral position, but also saying something that i think cr
to marry, even from imprisoned felons. this is a basic civil rights issue. i don't think this is the kind of issue that will divide the court the way other issues divide the court. >> asia mills and jimmy la sylvia, director of go proud. good to see you both. >> thanks for having me. >> frank bruni said the final chapter of this story has in fact been written. the question isn't whether there will be a happy ending, the question is when. asia, is he right? >> absolutely. the tide has completely shifted on the as you announced earlier, the polling on marriage equality. we know this is not a matter of if, it is a matter of when. the states are moving this direction, it is a matter of time. >> even with the politicians, you see this move. jimmy, i was thinking about the fact that gay rights supporters weren't welcome at cpac, and you know who was, phyllis shaf lee, credited with turning back the equal rights amendment when in the '70s it seemed like a done deal. is it possible the celebrations are premature? >> i can tell you i agree, we have reached a tipping point on this. i was part of a
will nominate thomas harris as the new labor secretary. he heads the justice department civil rights division. he faced criticism for giving misleading testimony to the u.s. mission on civil rights. he would replace hilda sill lease. instead of eating while you were distracted you are consuming more calories. people who eat meals or snacks watching tv playing games or reading tend to eat more. >> i do believe that study. >> the u.s. postal service is $16 billion in debt and stopping saturday delivery to stay athroat they say. you wouldn't know it by the way the agency is spending millions to send workers to a lavish conference in california and it is happening this week. we have an inside look at the event. >> here at the annual postal forum executives will meet with thousands of shippers and those in the direct mail industry. and then everyone gets to have a good time in stan fran. there's a guolf outing dance an food from the fisherman's wharf and chinatowchinatown. the travel exhibit space and other incidentals will cost the postal service $2.2 million lass. the agency receives no tax doll
like this. it's a civil rights case, it seems like that would be the legacy that they want. but more curious things have happened in this court. let's go to doma for a second. >> the importance of doma says the federal government cannot deny federal benefits to people just because they are involved in a same-sex marriage. every single issue we are concerned about, whether it's lbgt worker's women boment baum care, all of those issues will be played out in the context of the immigration bill. in my point there is no point of bringing people out of the shadows only to make them second class citizens. it's all of us liberty and justice for all that has to happen. >> michael: yeah "politico" has an article out saying that there are these republican -- big doers in the republican party, that are going to give a lot more money if republicans start taking a stand that says -- that legalizes gay marriage in america. how big of factor is this, and do you believe it? >> i absolutely think there are gay republicans, some of them are my friends, that say it's tough for me.
than that. last year they were making san francisco the rights to civil council city, the city of gideon. there are civil cases, eviction cases, family law cases where the consequences, the results followed in court are almost as severe to what gideon faced and what people face in criminal cases. what we recognize at the outset of the supervisors proclamation is part inspirational, our leaders in the community have rallied around it and the bar association and our firms have taken on more conviction cases. later we'll be holding an event to thank people in these positions and so please stay tuned about that. in the meantime let's focus on gideon and the public defenders role. i would say if there is ever a time and place to turn the tied and to bring the &m music back to gideon's trumpet. we thank you and look forward to a great day. thank you. [ applause ] >> about a year-and-a-half go we saw one of the most dramatic shifts when the state took funding and reallocated to local and housing for state prisoners. our next speaker chief probation officers not only in san francisco
of all colors. in 1968, dr. king told now is the time to come from the civil rights movement to the human rights movement. meaningful equality he said could not be achieved through civil rights alone. without basic human rights, the right to work, the right to shelter, the right to quality education, without basic human rights, he said, civil rights are an empty promise. so in honor of dr. king, and all those who labored to end the old jim crow, i hope we will commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to and mass incarceration. a movement for education, not incarceration. a movement for jobs, not jail. a movement to end all these forms of legal discrimination against people, discrimination that denies them basic human rights, to work, to shelter, and the food. now, what must we do to begin this movement? first i believe we've got to begin by telling the truth. the whole truth. we've got to be willing to admit out loud that we as a nation have managed to re-create a caste like system in this country. we've got to be willing to tell the truth in our schools, in our churches and o
. there is nothing civil about letting somebody without their right mind decompensate to the to point that they lose their lives and sometimes other people lose their lives. our mother recently had called me and said that her son had been on the streets because he also left their house and the police called her first thing in the morning. she hadn't seen him in a long time and he had paranoid schizophrenia. they said your son is in the hospital. we arrested him on a 51/50. he was walking naked in the street in the middle of the night talking to himself. the mother and father jumped in the car and went to the emergency room and by the time they got there, the hospital had released him. i don't understand this. it's just, you know, i'm not a lawyer and i wasn't in the mental health field before, i just, i don't understand it. the qualifications and criteria for a holder extreme and they are unrealistic. a person much be imminently danger to self or others or gravely disabled before they are picked up. if your shelter is under a freeway, if he knows of a garbage can that he can frequent, he's not grave
luther king memorial in washington. the president, connecting one civil rights and human rights leader to another, it's the melting of history, disconnection, the connection of the civil rights movement. that's the president brought throughout his trip. >> the story of the exodus was perhaps the central story, the most powerful image about emerging from the grip of bondage to reach for liberty and human dignity, carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. >> african-americans and jewish americans march with rabbis carrying as they walked. they boarded buses for freedom rights together. they bled together, gave their lives together. >> this is our obligation, not simply to bear witness but to act. for us, in our time, this means confronting bigotry and hatred in all of its forms. >> confronting it in all of its forms all over the world. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> shameless. let's play "hardball". ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. i hated the iraq war, said so when i s
in 2010, i appeared before the house judiciary subsidy committee on civil rights and civil liberties. i highlighted the numerous ways in which the internet has contributed to our economy and society as a whole. today, the impact is greater. in addition to the millions of jobs created, the internet economy accounts for only 5% of our gross domestic product according to a boston consulting group study. the internet has information an opportunity at the thinner -- fingertips of millions of users. we need updated laws to allow the ecosystem to continue to grow. on a daily basis, i see challenges created. 2010, google launched a transparency report which details the volume of requests for user data. in the last half of 2012, the number of requests google received from government agencies in criminal cases more than doubled compared to the same time in 2009. in 1986 whened electronics communications services were in their infancy. the statute no longer provides protection users reasonably expect. one example the committee may already be familiar with is from the rolls around compelled disclos
.org/possibilities. >>> tomorrow, the supreme court will begin hearing arguments in two of the biggest civil rights cases to reach its docket in years, if not in decades. up for consideration, doma, the so-called defense of marriage act, and california's proposition 8. as the court prepares for an historic moment, more public figures are weighing in. we can now add senator claire mccaskill of missouri and senator mark warner of virginia to the growing number of current and former lawmakers throwing their support behind marriage equality. senator mccaskill wrote, "i have come to the conclusion that our government should not limit the right to marry based on who you love. while churches should never be required to conduct marriages outside of their religious beliefs, neither should the government tell people who they have a right to marry." senator mark warner announced his support for marriage equality in a facebook post. "i support marriage equality because it is the fair and right thing to do." one of the two lawyers arguing against california's prop 8, david boyce, has predicted vark victory. >> i think we're g
, an historic civil rights march. the reverend martin luther king jr. led 25,000 marchers to the st state capitol to protest the denial of voting rights to blacks. >>> happy birthday to aretha franklin. she turns 71. >>> here's a look at what's coming up on the "today" show. former penn state assistant coach jerry sandusky speaks out from behind bars for the first time since being convicted of child abuse. and usher talks about joining "the voice" ahead of tonight's season premiere. a shout-out to knbc and our friends at "today in l.a." last friday i was out there visiting, and they couldn't have been any more welcoming. great morning show and great morning team. thanks for the 70-degree weather. we need that. right, bill? keep it on this channel. i'm richard lui along with bill karins. thanks for watching "early today," just your first stop of the day on your nbc station. have a great monday. . . . >>> new this morning, the search for a swimmer who disappeared off the coast of half moon bay continues. we'll have the latest details next. >>> plus, people all over in the bay area getting r
of civil rights activist bob offer. he says officers searched his phone without a warrant after he was arrested for peaceful civil dis bead yen yens. so far no comment from the police department and city attorney. >>> also the district attorney's office has decided at least for now not to charge a man suspected of i killing a newspaper vendor. the da says right now there's not enough evidence to charge mark anthony cassel with murder. police say he lifted 77-year- old dallas airs without warning and then dropped him to the pavement. the long time san francisco chronicle vendor died of his injuries a few weeks later. the da's office says it's not ruling out the possibility of charging cassel some time in the future. in the meantime he remains in custody on unrelated drug and theft charges. >>> grief counselors were available at lincoln high school as word spread that the victim was an eleventh gladier at the school. officials have identified donye as the pedestrian killed on the train tracks. the school's principal said he was known for his love o
nixon and eisenhower it was a civil rights party of lincoln and the the democrats -- >> jackie robinson. >> and martin luther king was a big supporter until they had a bad moment when nixon didn't come to his aid. nixon was working in the senate and lobbied for a stronger version of the 1967 bill that was a landmark bill at the time, so they were very different parties and the leaders of the party there was a liberal and conservative wing so to speak, the conservative wing, people like robert taft, he was an isolationist but he supported the pensions. he had a real social conscience and so on. there were out fliers to the trustees six out fliers in the country and there was senator mccarthy but they were out fliers to be dated and speak with authority, and in fact even though eisenhower was reluctant to take anybody on directly, she felt he did want to get mccarthy from the party that put next-gen up to it. >> one of the challenges for someone writing about richard nixon i think, i would like to know if you share this view, that we have an ocean of information about him as president lar
of labor. he currently heads the civil rights division and would be the only hispanic in the president's second-term cabinet if confirmed. >>> police in india say five men have confessed to raping a swiss tourist. two more suspects are being sought here. >>> in canada, a daring escape from a quebec prison when two inmates suspended by cables flew to freedom at least temporarily. within hours police located the chopper and captured one of the men along with two other suspects. authorities saying the second fugitive was arrested overnight. >>> the faa is expected to make a final decision today on closing some air traffic control towers. 173 towers are on the chopping block as a result of the sequester. >>> boy or will? william and kate have different preferences and are apparently split when it comes to the gender of their baby due to july. the duchess told a guard during a medals ceremony that she would like a boy while prince william wants a girl. >>> and some of the most iconic images in green to celebrate st. patrick's day. sydney's famed opera house, pyramids, leaning tower of pisa
better to look at your property today, have it inspected, and make the changes because this is a civil rights statute. it is the same thing as discrimination based on race, and it is treated the same way in the courts. >> i heard the previous speaker make some good points about be a pro are the -- proactive about getting a task inspector before you get sued. i am f. task inspector. if you have to cut -- heard the term thrown around, inspection created by our state senators, and it is really great information out there that i want to encourage everyone. i will not be able to go into extensive details, but i will be able to tell you a little bit of what is involved. the difference is in the california building code. i can also give you tips on how to choose and specter appeared first of all, the program has an inspector's knowledge of the california building code, and the reason why that is so important is because you have to comply with both. the california billing code is enforced when you get a building permit, and forced by the local building requirements. it says all new buildings h
and civil right vests are also on the list. >>> the san francisco bread company is opening a new store tomorrow. the first 100 people in line will get one free loaf of bread every day for a year. this is video from december of another store opening. organizers expect people to begin camping out tonight to reserve their spot in line. >>> mark is here now. getting a chance to meet the 49ers newest receiver today. >> also on hand was their new place kicker. mr. dawson. they're excited about this new receiver giving the 49ers another legitimate threat for their quarterback to throw to. this guy, boldin is a true professional. showed up today. now he is officially is 49er. he's actually called his quarterback to make sure the two are on the same page. all is good, although he admits initially didn't know what to make of the deal when it was first announced. >> initially was shocking. but i think once all of that wears off you get to examine the situation. for me it's great. the one thing i can say is that a very talented team. a team i played against in the super bowl. it's a team that's ri
. he currently is the assistant attorney general heading the justice departments civil rights decision. if approved perez will take over the position from hilda who resigned in january. he has the backing of organized labor groups but could face opposition from republicans because he played a leading role in a decision to challenge voter id laws in texas and south carolina that could restrict minority voting rights. >>> several protesters and postal workers gathered in front of the national postal forum in san francisco today. many are upset about the postal service letting go of jobs and even closing post offices. ktvu's brian flores is outside one of the historic post offices slated to close with both sides of the controversy. good afternoon brian. >> reporter: good afternoon, tori. many postal workers say they are upset because their livelihoods are in danger, not only their jobs or pay may be reduced but historical post offices may close. meantime postal officials have attended the conference to generate new business despite paying milli
is that this is like civil rights. that this is the civil rights movement moved to the gay and lesbian community. why is that not the case? >> well, we understand historically that keeping the races apart is wrong. what marriage is about is bringing together the two opposite halves of humanity for a deep social good. that's why as president obama himself said, there are people of good will on both sides of this issue. what we need the supreme court to do is not try to short circuit this debate. we need to keep the debate alive. americans on both sides of this issue are deeply invested in this debate. we don't need a 50-state solution presented by the supreme court. when our democratic institutions are capable of handling the issue. that's what the court will decide. whether it's going to impose a redefinition of marriage among all americans or whether we're going to be allowed to continue to work on this together state by state. >> so not a roe v. wade decision is what's being argumented, don't make a decision that then sets the stage arguing four years to come. >> look, candy, this case -- the case
for discriminating against latinos. he's a fighter for civil rights and as lake secretary, he'll stand up for the rights of the working class. thanks for much whatting. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> reince priebus. what more can i say? let's play "hardball." >>> good evening, i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with that bridge being detonated down in texas. wow. that's what reince priebus, himself, is doing to the republican party. he talks about building bridges to african-americans, but isn't he the same reince priebus who is chairman of the republican national committee and presided over a voter suppression effort in three dozen states, aimed at keeping african-americans from even voting? wasn't the country's number one birther, donald trump, speaker at the conservative convention? and wasn't that sarah palin letting loose with the latest crack about the need to check president obama's background? priebus talks about getting the true nature of the party out to the public. he says it's been a communications problem. wasn't the most excellent commu
in our party. >> but if certain voices seem intent to move forward on civil rights, the party's right flank is digging in its heels. >> young conservatives, 30 and under, 35 and under, gay marriage, all that matters. homosexual marriage. if the party makes that something official, that they support, they're not going to pull the homosexual activist voters away from the democrat party. but they are going to -- cause their base to stay home. and throw their hands up in utter frustration. >> similar frustration was echoed by evangelicals and social conservatives. family reform council president tony perkins has wrote this week, raince priebus's has decided that the way for his party -- >> president of the national organization for marriage, brian brown, sass the grassroots of the party are 100% committed to protecting marriage and you can't just kick them to the curb. >> and according to faith and freedom coalition founder, raffle reed, if the republican party tries to retreat from being a pro marriage, pro family party, the big tent is going to become a pup tent very fast. >> will repub
's civil rights division as his mom knee to head the labor d., and we will carry that announcement live at about 11:40 eastern this morning here on c-span2. also at 12:30, remarks from michigan senator carl levin. he'll be speaking at the council on foreign relations on u.s. defense policy issues. life coverage begins at 12:30 eastern again here on c-span2. and the u.s. house and senate return today to consider continuing funding for the federal government past march 27th when current funding expires. they're also expected to work on their respective budget plans for fiscal year 204. the house back at 2 p.m. for legislative business. floor debate likely while members wait for the senate to ask. also the senate in at 3 p.m. --2 p.m. eastern. and then hoping to move on to the 2014 budget resolution, and they hope to get it approved before by the end of the week before the easter recess. life coverage of the house, as usual, on c-span and, of course, the senate right here on c-span2. ..2 last week endorsed a review of military roles to allow seniors to manage overturns sexual assault victi
's made protecting that promise for everybody the cause of his life. as a civil rights attorney, an aide to senator ted kennedy, a member of the montgomery, maryland, county council. tom fought for a level playing field where hard work and responsibility are rewarded and working families can get ahead. and this is not the first time he's chosen to be a labor secretary either. we've got here today governor martin o'malley. and martin appointed tom as secretary of maryland's department of labor where he helped implement the country's first statewide living wage law because he understood minimum wage should be a wage you can live on. and current role as the head of the u.s. justice department and civil rights position he's fought to open pathways into the work force for everyone willing to contribute including people with disabilities, lgbt americans and immigrants. and he's helped settle some of the largest cases ever on behalf of families targeted by unfair mortgage lending. now, while he's tackled plenty of tough issues, tom's also spent a career as a consensus voter. he's worked with ce
in which you don't have to have a majority position. civil rights not put up for a vote. right. that's right. >> frequently. >> frequently although now what has happened is that this sea change meant they can be successfully put up for a vote. how -- but the third part of it is this interpersonal thing. dan, you said this thing the last time you were on the show, you said the superpower lgbt people have, inherently mixed among the population. >> we are born into the families of the, you know, oppressor class. for lack of any better term. gay people are born to straight parents. the most dash single most for political act of any lgbt person can take is to be out to family and friends. we saw in ohio with senator portman the difference that can make. it can open someone's eyes. republican failure of empathy. senator portman wasn't for marriage when other people's children were allowed to marry, other people's children were gay. now that he has gay child, he sees the justice in gay marriage. we will take the support however we can get it. it shouldn't take people's kids come out but oft
unconstitutiona. now, the supreme court has been asked to weigh n which is why these civil rights leaders gage yord to say smi ni decision will affect what happens here in california. >> we're seeing if it's unconstitutional to violate rights in michigan then why is it being done in california? >> in the first year after prop 209 passed, uc bolt lawsuit reported of the 271 students admitted only one was african american. tanya capner is an example of how things changed. >> so you face a situation where i was the only black student in the class after the ban for education program that. is just unacceptable. >> ward connereely is considered to be the man behind prop 209 and michigan's antiaffirmative action law. >> there is nothing more fundamental in my view than right to equal treatment bit government of every citizen in this country. >> bertrall ross teaches law at uc berkeley. >> two laws are similar to each other. i would say whatever the court says about prop 2 would have the same impact on prop 209. >> the supreme court will reaffirm the antiaffirmative action law in the fall. one footnot
want to thank the 75 organizations that have come together around this issue representing our civil rights, labor, and social justice and religious organizations as well as our diverse communities including leaders from our african-american, asian american, latino, lgbt and jewish communities. my second item is to call for a hearing around a potential sewage disaster. as supervisor yee well knows from district 7 two weeks ago, a pc water main broke in west polk which damages 23 homes on a residential block. over the past two years our city has had over 200 water main breaks and about as many burst water sewer lines and paid out claims and judgments in that period totaling over $5 million. in today's chronicle, and this is an article that is at the top of a bay area section of sf gate, the chronicle reported that the 8 washington [speaker not understood] project we considered last year is built as was currently planned could threaten our city's north force main, which is a sewer pipeline that carries one quarter of our city's sewage. serving the financial district, north beach, china
civil rights decision. if approved perez will take over the position from hilda who resigned in january. he has the backing of organized labor groups but could face opposition from republicans because he played a leading role in a decision to challenge voter id laws in texas and south carolina that could restrict minority voting rights. >>> several protesters and postal workers gathered in front of the national postal forum in san francisco today. many are upset about the postal service letting go of jobs and even closing post offices. ktvu's brian flores is outside one of the historic post offices slated to close with both sides of the controversy. good afternoon brian. >> reporter: good afternoon, tori. many postal workers say they are upset because their livelihoods are in danger, not only their jobs or pay may be reduced but historical post offices may close. meantime postal officials have attended the conference to generate new business despite paying millions of dollars to attend. >> but it must say important. >> speaking in front of hundreds of postal vendors, postmaster general
, in the justice department's civil rights division. speaker tom has worked to open pathways for everybody willing to contribute. including people with disabilities, and immigrants. and he has helped settle some of the largest cases ever on behalf of families targeted by unfair mortgage lending. >> the son of dominican immigrants, he was a staff lawyer to ted kennedy and labor secretary for the state of maryland. >> i'm confident with the business community, grassroots, independence alike, making progress for all working families. >> some business leaders like the mid-atlantic construction employer voiced fears perez will act as labor's prosecutor in chief. >> i don't think somebody who has a vast set of experiences, a lawyer for a government employee, those folks never work out very well for understanding what we do for a living. >> republican senator of louisiana followed to block the nomination, and doj inspector general said it has been plagued before and during the tenure by polarization and mistrust comic issue was the testimony before the commission that investigated the offense 2008 voter
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